Last edited by Kele
Tuesday, July 14, 2020 | History

3 edition of Local management of trees and woodland resources in Zimbabwe found in the catalog.

Local management of trees and woodland resources in Zimbabwe

a tenurial niche approach

by Louise Fortmann

  • 393 Want to read
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by Centre for Applied Social Sciences, University of Zimbabwe, in conjunction with Oxford Forestry Institute, Dept. of Plant Sciences, University of Oxford in [Harare] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Zimbabwe.,
  • Zimbabwe
    • Subjects:
    • Forest management -- Zimbabwe.,
    • Forest management -- Social aspects -- Zimbabwe.,
    • Tree crops -- Social aspects -- Zimbabwe.,
    • Community forests -- Zimbabwe -- Management.,
    • Land tenure -- Zimbabwe.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (leaves [13]-34).

      Statementby L. Fortmann and C. Nhira.
      SeriesCASS occasional paper - NRM,, 0141-8181 ;, CASS occasional paper - NRM ;, 1992/9.
      ContributionsNhira, Calvin., University of Zimbabwe. Centre for Applied Social Sciences., Oxford Forestry Institute.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsSD242.Z55 F67 1992
      The Physical Object
      Pagination34 leaves ;
      Number of Pages34
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1075633M
      ISBN 100850741270
      LC Control Number93981944

      State of national forest management in Zimbabwe 1 local resource alone. The situation will definitely worsen in future. This gave rise to Woodlands and trees in large scale commercial farming areas Woodlands and trees on the large scale commercial farms cover about 7 million ha. Muuyu (Sh); Umkhomo (Nd) Characteristics: Unmistakable huge tree with an average girth of up to 18m (there is a record specimen with a girth of 47m), growing up to 25m, with a smooth bark; it has large, white, pendulous flowers that emerge briefly in early summer; when baobabs die, they collapse into a vegetative heap and rot; the most well-known tree in the Victoria Falls area is the "Big.

      Bojo, J () Economic valuation of indigenous woodlands. In: Bradley, PN, McNamara, K (eds) Living With Trees: Policies for Forestry Management in Zimbabwe. World Bank Technical Paper – Washington DC: World Bank. Google Scholar. Zimbabwe loses about , hectares (, acres) of forests annually, according to Forestry Commission spokesperson Violet Makoto. Forest and woodland resources now .

      Harare is the capital of Zimbabwe, and it is a very pretty city with wide streets, the majority of them lined with Jacaranda trees which in October have beautiful p Places of Interest Our guide to Places of Interest by our Zimbabwe local expert - Another interesting place to visit in Zimbabwe is the Great Zimbabwe Ruins, found 30 kilometres. The Charter will launch on 6 November, years after the Charter of the Forest that re-established rights of access to the royal forest in medieval England On 6 November , the th anniversary of the influential Charter of the Forest, the Woodland Trust will launch the Charter for Trees, Woods and People. Rooted in more t ‘tree stories’ gathered from.


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Local management of trees and woodland resources in Zimbabwe by Louise Fortmann Download PDF EPUB FB2

Living with trees: policies for forestry management in Zimbabwe (English) Abstract. This report is an account of the results of a joint World Bank and Zimbabwe Forestry Commission study, in which the status, use, and future of Zimbabwe's forest, woodland and tree resources are by: Local organisations and natural resource management in the face of economic hardships: A case study from Zimbabwe Billy B.

Mukamuri, Bruce M. Campbell and Godwin Kowero 28 CHAPTER FIVE Institutional arrangements governing natural resource management of the miombo woodland Dennis Kayambazinthu, Frank Matose, George Kajembe and Nontonkozo.

Living with Trees, is an account of the results of a joint World Bank and Zimbabwe Forestry Commission study, in which the status, use and future of Zimbabwes forest, woodland and tree resources. Indigenous management of teak woodland in Zimbabwe, – Article in Journal of Historical Geography 33(4) October with Reads How we measure 'reads'.

A topical issue in natural resource management is that of scale, in particular, the organizational entry-point to community-based systems of natural resource management. This study investigated access to woodland resources from the perspective of the relevance of units (traditional villages) enjoying policy attention and the nature of boundaries of resource management units as Cited by: 9.

At the local level, management and utilisation of forest resources in Zimbabwe are governed mainly by the Forest Act and the Communal Lands Forest Produce Act. Other Acts have indirect effects on management and utilisation of forest resource e.g.

Mines and Minerals Act, which confers absolute rights to land for mining or establishes that mining. Communal forest and woodland management in Zimbabwe and many other countries in the Southern Africa region cannot be understood in terms of classical and scientific forest management principles alone.

Farmers manage trees as part of the farming system. As such communal farmers have always been engaged in some form of forest and woodland. This paper reports on action research that evaluated local perceptions and knowledge of indigenous tree planting and management in the Romwe catchment, Chivi District, southern Zimbabwe.

The species tested were the overexploited Afzelia quanzensis, important for timber and carvings of sculptures and utensils; Sclerocarya birrea, the marula tree used for wood, bark, and fruit; and Brachystegia. Mopane trees in Matebeland Zimbabwe.

Image credit ZIMSEC O Level Geography Notes: Natural Resources: Forestry: Zimbabwean forests: Mopani Savanna woodland. Also known as mopane; This type of woodland is mainly confined to parts of the middle and Lowveld, between and metres above sea level. Without proper management, “decisions" about how trees compete for growth resources are left entirely to natural competition.

Management Planning. Careful planning is required to increase the value of your woodlot. Writing a management plan will help you consider what you value about your woods and what you hope to achieve.

Indeed, they were to be re-appropriated in the late s in Zimbabwe's Community Areas Management Programme for Indigenous Resources (Campfire).

Traditional regulations prohibited the cutting down of fruit and large trees. The dare prescribed methods of harvesting fruits and other tree by-products as well as access to sacred groves and mountains. This James Fazio reference is the best "beginning" book on forestry and woodland management I have found to date.

It provides practical information on everything from controlling woods road erosion to identifying tree insects to inventorying your trees.

AMERICAS TOUR OFFICE. AfricanMecca, Inc Glenlivet Drive. Suite Allentown, PA United States of America. US Toll Free Phone: KARIBU-1 () International Phone: +1 () Fax: +1 () The management of woodland and forest products is embodied in the Forest Act and the Communal Land Forest Produce Act.

The Forest Act () provides for management of wood resources throughout Zimbabwe although its focus is state forests and on private land. The Communal Land Forest Produce Act applies to the Communal Areas like the Mugabe area.

The extent of knowledge of indigenous knowledge systems within the Kalanga rural community and the extent to which the knowledge is applied in mopane woodlands resource management will be identified.

The pressures regarding overuse of mopane woodland resources will be identified. Communal Areas Management Programme for Indigenous Resources (CAMPFIRE), is a multi-level programme implemented in a complex system.

CAMPFIRE aimed to change the governance of wildlife, seeking to integrate local communities into the wildlife and natural resource management. Other tree related research being conducted by various local institutions includes the ecology and management of indigenous trees, screening of multipurpose-purpose tree species for agroforestry systems, forest resource evaluations and the development forest resource sharing models between state authorities and communities living "on the edge.

Woodlands also provide direct economic benefits, such as wood for housing, furniture, books, newspapers, and many other products we use every day.

The sale of timber provides woodland owners with hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue annually. As a woodland owner, you do not have to choose between these benefits—they are often compatible.

Exploring changing livelihoods, and woodland use and management in the communal areas of Zimbabwe. Paper presented at a workshop on Off-forest Tree Resources of Africa, Arusha, Tanzania, 12–16 July The study was carried out in the Cusseque area of the Municipality of Chitembo in south-central Angola.

Our objectives were to assess the floristic diversity, the species composition, and stand structure of Miombo woodlands during regeneration after shifting cultivation. A total of 40 plots of m 2 were surveyed and analyzed, corresponding to mature forests/woodlands and three fallow types.

Covering much of central and southern Africa, the Miombo woodlands are a vast region of tropical grasslands, savannas and shrublands. Named for the oak-like "miombo" trees (Brachustegia spp.) that dominate the area, the woodlands are home to some 8, plant species; over which are provide food and cover for a diverse range of wildlife, including antelopes, giraffes, rhinos.Environmental Management in Zimbabwe 3 Significance of the Study A major motivation for worrying about natural resources in Zimbabwe is their importance to the national economy and to human survival against a declining biodiversity base as illustrated by the following examples.transparency and accountability in the exploitation of the natural resources and management of the resource revenues.

In this regard resource rich countries have with varying degrees of success put in place policies; institutional and legislative frameworks to manage the exploitation of natural resources as well as management of resource revenue.