Last edited by Kale
Friday, July 17, 2020 | History

3 edition of Attitudes toward physical activity of obese and non-obese children and their parents found in the catalog.

Attitudes toward physical activity of obese and non-obese children and their parents

Attitudes toward physical activity of obese and non-obese children and their parents

  • 386 Want to read
  • 28 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Attitude (Psychology),
  • Physical education for children,
  • Obesity in children -- Psychological aspects

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Wanda Kay Steininger
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Paginationix, 134 leaves
    Number of Pages134
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14056748M

    Abstract. The strong evidence linking behavior and health outcomes has led to the realization that truly healthy people, and truly healthy societies in these times, are distinguished by both a lack of physiological pathology and a pattern of behaviors that reduces one’s risk of developing the major chronic diseases (Hamburg, Elliott, & Parron, ; Matarazzo, ).Cited by: Obesity is a medical condition in which excess body fat has accumulated to the extent that it may have a negative effect on health. People are generally considered obese when their body mass index (BMI), a measurement obtained by dividing a person's weight by the square of the person's height, is over 30 kg/m 2, with the range kg/m 2 defined as overweight.

    A literature review on physical activity revealed that free time physical activity self-reported by 9–year-old children and teenagers is similar in all the ethnic groups, but White, Non-Hispanics report much more participation in organized physical activity than African Americans or Hispanics; this finding may be related to unique barriers. Obesity is a medical condition in which excess body fat has accumulated to the extent that it may have a negative effect on are generally considered obese when their body mass index (BMI), a measurement obtained by dividing a person's weight by the square of the person's height, is over 30 kg/m, with the range 25–30 kg/m defined as overweight.

      In behavioral weight loss programs, women typically are instructed to consume a tokcal d ( MJ) diet composed of conventional foods and men a similar diet of kcal d ( MJ). This intervention, combined with weekly group treatment sessions, produces an average loss of of initial weight in weeks (48)/5. Children, Obesity and Exercise provides sport, exercise and medicine students and professionals with an accessible and practical guide to understanding and managing childhood and adolescent obesity.В В It covers: overweight, obesity and body composition;В В physical activity, growth and development;В В В.


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Attitudes toward physical activity of obese and non-obese children and their parents Download PDF EPUB FB2

Attitudes toward physical activity of obese and non-obese children and their parents. [Wanda Kay Steininger] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Contacts Book\/a>, bgn:Thesis\/a>, schema:CreativeWork\/a>.

This study investigated differences in the explicit and implicit attitudes towards food and physical activities between children with obesity (n=38) and a matched control group (n=38).

To compare the physical activity (PA) patterns and the hypothesized psychosocial and environmental determinants of PA in an ethnically diverse sample of obese and non-obese middle school children.

Not surprisingly, peers are frequent critics of obese children, and school is a common setting where weight bias occurs. Research shows that negative attitudes toward obese children begin as early as preschool age, from three to five years old.

Preschoolers report that their overweight peers are mean and less desirable playmatesFile Size: KB. Negative attitudes toward obese persons are pervasive in North American society. Numerous studies have documented harmful weight-based stereotypes that overweight and obese individuals are lazy, weak-willed, unsuccessful, unintelligent, lack self-discipline, have poor willpower, and are noncompliant with weight-loss treatment.

1–3 These stereotypes give way to stigma, prejudice, and. Childhood obesity is on the rise in both industrialized and developing countries. The investigation of the psychosocial aspects of childhood obesity has been the focus of long- standing theoretical and empirical endeavor.

Overweight in children and adolescents is associated with a host of psychological and social problems such as reduced school and social performance, less favorable. Introduction. The prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity has tripled in the past 30 years in the United States.

Recent estimates from –, indicate that approximately % of youth ages 2 to 19 were either overweight or obese, and % of those youth were obese [].While childhood overweight and obesity have begun to stabilize, the most recent NHANES data show that class 2 Cited by: Although both obese men and women face wage‐related obstacles, they experience discrimination in different ways.

An analysis from the National Longitudinal Survey Youth Cohort examined earnings in over men and women 18 to 25 years old and reported that obese women earned 12% less than non‐obese women ((25)).

Like studies to follow Cited by: Obesity is a medical condition in which excess body fat has accumulated to an extent that it may have a negative effect on health.

People are generally considered obese when their body mass index (BMI), a measurement obtained by dividing a person's weight by the square of the person's height, is over 30 kg/m 2; the range 25–30 kg/m 2 is defined as stic method: BMI > 30 kg/m².

provide integrated nutrition education for children and their parents with the goal of establishing healthy food/physical activity choices as part of healthy lifestyle 3. provide support for healthy eating/physical activity by involving community partners, like school administrators and other school/community partners.

This research examined whether preschool-aged children show less trust in physically disabled or obese informants. In Study 1, when learning about novel physical activities and facts, 4- and 5-year-olds preferred to endorse the testimony of a physically abled, non-obese informant rather than a physically disabled or obese one.

In Study 2, after seeing that the physically disabled or obese Cited by: 9. Research shows that negative attitudes toward obese children begin as early as preschool age, from three to five years old. Preschoolers report that their overweight peers are.

Obese children are usually less active than their normal-weight counterparts, although the reasons for this remain unclear. The objective of the present study was to determine how a long-term program (3 years of intervention and 6 months of follow-up detraining) of physical exercise with or without a low calorie diet influenced sedentary obese children’s intention to be physically : Antonio García-Hermoso, Jose M.

Saavedra, Yolanda Escalante, Ana M. Domínguez. Physical Fitness in Obese Children. Physical fitness is defined by multiple components that address an individual’s ability to perform a task or activity.

Body composition is the only health-related fitness component that does not involve a performance-based task; however body composition status indirectly affects other fitness components Cited by: 2. Demonstrates the knowledge and skills to achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical activity and fitness" 4.

Exhibits responsible personal and social behavior that respects self and others." 5. Recognizes the value of physical activity for health, enjoyment, challenge, self. Children are most frequently teased by unfamiliar children and classmates, then familiar classmates and siblings, and even parents, adults in their lives, and adult strangersIn a study examining the attitudes of high school teachers on obesity, the teachers indicated their belief that obese teens were unkempt, emotional, less likely Cited by:   In general, obese children choose to be sedentary when they are given the option of engaging in physical or sedentary activity, because they have a more negative perception of physical activity and find physical activity less reinforcing than sedentary activity relative to their nonobese peers.

Highly reinforcing sedentary activities Cited by:   This can certainly be damaging to their self-image and popularity. In addition, obese children run the risk of suffering orthopedic problems such as knee injuries, and they have an increased risk of heart disease and stroke in adulthood (Lu, ).

It is hard for a child who is obese to become a non-obese adult. The prevalence rates of overweight and obesity in Chinese children continuously increased from toand the annual mean increase rate of obesity was the highest in – [].The obesity rate of urban children increased rapidly in –, with a mean annual increase of % [].The obesity rate in rural areas increased from % in to % in [7,8].Cited by: 1.

Physical activity-key issues in treatment of childhood obesity. Acta Paediatr Suppl. ;96() PubMed abstract A review of what is known about physical activity in pediatric obesity treatment and practical recommendations, which a health care provider can suggest to obese children and their families.

Obese individuals are highly stigmatized and face multiple forms of prejudice and discrimination because of their weight ((), ()).The prevalence of weight discrimination in the United States has increased by 66% over the past decade (()), and is comparable to rates of racial discrimination, especially among women (()).Weight bias translates into inequities in employment settings, health‐care Cited by: children in physical activity.

Many also involve parents to promote more healthful eating and greater physical activity when children are not in school. These studies indicate that school-based programs, policies, and environments can make a difference in childhood obesity.

Changes in Child Care Mary Story, Simone French, and Karen.Obesity is a medical condition in which excess body fat has accumulated to the extent that it may have a negative effect on health. People are generally considered obese when their body mass index (BMI), a measurement obtained by dividing a person's weight by the square of the person's height, is over 30 kg/m 2, with the range 25–30 kg/m 2 defined as overweight.